Bargentum
All Items : : Pre 1900 item #1037188 (stock #X2364C)
Bargentum
$32.00
Clematis is a lovely pattern introduced by Gorham in 1885. It was first acid-etched – that is, the pattern is revealed by etching of the surface with an acid bath – and the details were then hand- engraved to provide the multi-textured surface that is characteristic of this pattern... there is the sense of a vine that follows the form of the spoon's upper handle, with the leaves and flowers springing from that vine. The almond-shaped bowl terminates in a point and retains a light but even ...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1037189 (stock #X2234)
Bargentum
$75.00
This simple and beautiful coin silver serving spoon from a fine old Boston maker is in wonderful condition – an Oval Thread handle balanced by an elegant teardrop bowl, with almost no scratches at all – clearly well cared for in its 150 years – no dings, dents, or bends to be seen or felt. The front of the handle is engraved with the name Abbott in Gothic lettering, and it's 8-5/8 in. long. Weight is 66 grams.
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1038965 (stock #X1084)
Bargentum
$38.00
“Bead” is one of those early coin patterns that was made by several makers, although the earliest association is with John Polhemus / Polhamus, ca. 1850. This design appears on the underside as well as the top and is marked simply Jones, Ball & Poor, a Boston maker / retailer, as well as a small and faint script monogram, Cheever. The condition is quite good, with light age-related wear – no bends or dents or pits. The length is 5.4 inches, the bowl is 1-15/16 inches and weighs 18 gra...
All Items : Silver : Sterling : Pre 1900 item #1038967 (stock #X2387A)
Bargentum
$50.00
The Chrysanthemum pattern was introduced by Gorham in 1885, together with many other bright-cuts that were emerging at that time. The bright-cut pieces were hand-engraved – no two are exactly alike, and were labor intensive. The bowl of this attractive sauce ladle has chrysanthemums engraved in the acid-etched bowl as well. There are no monograms or removals, scratches or bends or dings. The length is just under 6 inches (hard to measure!) and the weight is 34 grams. The mark is the Gorha...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1038971 (stock #X2246)
Bargentum
$50.00
“Louis XIV” mustard spoon / ladle by Henry Hebbard is marked with the patent date of 1847 and with the retailer J. Rudd & Co. The pattern is double-struck, and is in fine condition. There are no bends, and the bowl has an excellent finish. There is a lovely period script monogram MEM. The length is 5.25 inches, the bowl 7/8 inches, and the weight is 20 grams.
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1057030 (stock #X2533)
Bargentum
$50.00
Typical of Martin Hall (Sheffield), these 2 berry spoons are very well made, with close attention to detail. They are silver plate, 8 in. long, and date from ca. 1875. The bowls are scalloped; the upper – twisted – half of the handles spring from skeletal figures and are topped with plinths supporting St. Peter. The whole is acid-etched, and both bowls and apostles have light gold-washed finishes. There is a small area of light staining on the bowl which may clean, but I have chosen not ...
All Items : : Pre 1900 item #1057461 (stock #X2450)
Bargentum
$35.00
Jac Rose is a bright-cut pattern made by several manufacturers, but this one is by Gorham, who introduced it in 1885. The entire surface is acid-etched, providing greater contrast for the rose and leaves highlighted by the engraver. The beautiful bowl is used on many of the Gorham Jac Rose servers – pointed with a small flange, with the suggestion of a shell in its interior. The spoon could be used for sugar, marmalade, or as a small berry spoon. The jac rose is again carved into the bowl. ...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1060732 (stock #X2265)
Bargentum
$850.00
“Beaded” became a “standard pattern” – that is, there were many makers and versions from ca. 1850 through the coin period. Philadelphia's is distinguished by the inclusion of a fleur de lys at the top and bottom of the handle. This group bears the mark of Philadelphia retailer C. Bard & Son. There is wear to the pattern, more on the forks than the spoons (see enlargements; the first 2 pics are the forks, the next 3 the spoons). The group is structurally sound – that is, there are...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1064624 (stock #X2587)
Bargentum
SOLD
The fish slice / knife / server as it evolved in the 19th Century took the form of its blade from the body of a headless and tailless fish. John Westervelt's interpretation includes an engraved medallion head inscribed in a roundel on the handle, very likely that of Oceanus, whose body was that of a fish. This piece is decorated by neo-classical motifs – acanthus, dart-and-egg, floral sprays – in engraving, bright-cutting, and engine-turning. The twisted handle is thick and adds strength...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1064629 (stock #X2504)
Bargentum
$150.00
It's hard to say who actually made these spoons – they are unsigned, but marked simply “COIN 3,” and an (unknown) retailer G. Cram – but the habits of both William B. Durgin and Knowles & Ladd which sometimes included that practice, i.e., silver content and a numeral, could argue for either, and their uncommon design would seem to reinforce that assumption. The handles are straight-edged and terminate in 5 lobes. The hand-engraved surface of the handles uses wiggle-work to enclose a t...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1064630 (stock #X2510)
Bargentum
$175.00
The death of George Washington is usually credited with this variation in the austere taste in silver that was popular in America at the end of the 18th Century. With the otherwise rounded corners of the spoons beveled to suggest a coffin, this style is considered by many as a uniquely American invention. Longer, more pointed bowls complete the visual suggestion of length from the straight handles of the 7 spoons. The downturn at the (reverse tipt) ends of the handles is slight, the only reli...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1065692 (stock #X2584)
Bargentum
$60.00
The pattern is an unnamed one (although sometimes called 'Queen of the Sea' to distinguish it) attributed Philo Gilbert of New York, ca, 1860, but seldom sold with his mark. Rather, a multitude of retailers – including Gorham and Shiebler – have appeared on examples of this pattern; these are marked with New York City jeweler Giles, Wales & Co. This was a full-line pattern having everything from place pieces to large and small servers. The condition is excellent – no tine wear, no scra...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1065698
Bargentum
$210.00
John R. Wendt trained for his craft in Germany before moving to Boston, and around 1860 to New York in order to provide silver largely to Ball, Black & Co. His patterns were creative and his work excellent. 'Ribbon' was introduced ca. 1870, using a variety of delicate design elements that seem to layer the length of the upper handle like 'ribbons' which are held in place with two bands and terminate under a small bead. Condition is good – there is no softening of the pattern, no bending...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1065699
Bargentum
$50.00
Northern California's silver industry was a natural outgrown of the discovery of silver there in 1849, and several jewelers and silversmiths emigrated to San Francisco to contribute to the new economic wealth that was California's. Several businesses emerged, many making or selling the same patterns in silver. “Gothic” (Reichel, Vanderslice, Koehler & Ritter) and “Eureka” (Schulz & Fischer) were a variation on Gorham's “Cottage” which had been introduced in 1861, and probably appe...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1066369 (stock #X1770G)
Bargentum
$30.00
This lovely Whiting sterling pattern has only recently been identified as “La France,'' having previously been known as “Roses and Scroll” or whatever the viewer might choose. It doesn't seem to have been a full line pattern, but one that people are often drawn to. The handle shows a softening of the pattern and is punctuated by a shallow N monogram. The pointed bowl has light but even remnants of gold wash with a small and very shallow dent that is mentioned for clarity. This citrus ...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1068813
Bargentum
$77.00
This was probably a place spoon – larger than English or American counterparts at 9-1/8 inches. The type – a 'reverse tipt' – spoon was made in virtually every silver-producing country in the 19th Century, and fits easily with the city mark for Kronstadt – modern Brasov – for 1850. Kronstadt was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1850, but is now in Romania. With the city mark is the letter N, – it could be a year code, but I have been unable to get the mark closer than ca. 1850...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1068817
Bargentum
$95.00
Gorham introduced 'Old Baronial' in 1998, during the tenure of William Codman as chief of design at Gorham. Codman's background in restoration of medieval objects is evident in this pattern which invokes the revival of the Gothic period in Baronial Europe – in this case, the blending of a lion's head with foliate, scroll and floral motifs. The spoon is in very fine condition with no problems whatever, a touch over 8.5 in. long and it weighs 80 grams. The handle has a monogram of LR on the f...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1068821
Bargentum
$95.00
The pleasing use of acid etching to define the floral surface of 'Clematis' (introduced in 1885) combines with delicate engraving of leaves and vine to give new life to a standard Old English pattern. The bowl is elongated with a suggestion of honeysuckle in the repousse treatment, and terminates in a soft point. It might have been used for pudding, but certainly shouldn't be limited to that! There are remains of gold wash in the bowl. Length is 9.25 in., the weight is 57 g., and there is a ...
 
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