Bargentum
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1057030 (stock #X2533)
Bargentum
$50.00
Typical of Martin Hall (Sheffield), these 2 berry spoons are very well made, with close attention to detail. They are silver plate, 8 in. long, and date from ca. 1875. The bowls are scalloped; the upper – twisted – half of the handles spring from skeletal figures and are topped with plinths supporting St. Peter. The whole is acid-etched, and both bowls and apostles have light gold-washed finishes...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1065699
Bargentum
$50.00
Northern California's silver industry was a natural outgrown of the discovery of silver there in 1849, and several jewelers and silversmiths emigrated to San Francisco to contribute to the new economic wealth that was California's. Several businesses emerged, many making or selling the same patterns in silver...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1034956 (stock #227)
Bargentum
$50.00
Nice example of Gorham's multi-motif pattern introduced in 1890. The French style implied by the pattern's name has Rococo elements that go well with the heart-shaped bowl which has a repousse “rat tail” extending nearly to its tip. There is a very, very faint remnant of a monogram D, but it's so shallow and worn (not removed) as to be almost indiscernible. Marked simply with the Gorham logo and the word “sterling.” The condition is excellent...
All Items : Silver : Contemporary item #1068825
Bargentum
$42.00
Ricco / Ricci Argentieri is a very old Italian silver manufacturer that claims to use 10 times the normal amount of silver in the plating process. The “Bernini” pattern displays light classic elements – volute, acanthus, thread, shell – on the handle, and the serving blade echoes the shape of the handle. This handsome, solid piece is well-finished and has not been used, showing only the scratches that came from storage drawer in the store. It is 10.5 in. long...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1920 item #1080177
Bargentum
$40.00
This ice? spoon or straining server could be used for many things – poached eggs, peas, quenelles... It was manufactured in Brussels by Orfevrerie Bruno Wiskemann (established 1869), in the 'Fiddle Thread' pattern, adaptable to many tables. It is in excellent condition – no missing plating, discoloration or heel wear, and with no monograms – wonderful condition. Marked with the old Wiskemann mark. The length is 9.5 in. long.
All Items : Silver : Pre 1920 item #1111027 (stock #1482C)
Bargentum
$38.00
'Plymouth' was introduced in 1911, at the time when tastes were turning from ornamental styles to Colonial Revival; it was a very popular pattern. Multiple threads outline the handle which terminates with a boss. The fork is in excellent condition – hardly, if ever – used, with no monogram or removal. It is 6-3/16 in. and weighs 32 g. It has the Gorham mark and 'sterling' on the reverse.
All Items : Silver : Pre 1950 item #1111026 (stock #X1794B)
Bargentum
$38.00
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1038965 (stock #X1084)
Bargentum
$38.00
“Bead” is one of those early coin patterns that was made by several makers, although the earliest association is with John Polhemus / Polhamus, ca. 1850. This design appears on the underside as well as the top and is marked simply Jones, Ball & Poor, a Boston maker / retailer, as well as a small and faint script monogram, Cheever. The condition is quite good, with light age-related wear – no bends or dents or pits...
All Items : : Pre 1900 item #1057461 (stock #X2450)
Bargentum
$35.00
Jac Rose is a bright-cut pattern made by several manufacturers, but this one is by Gorham, who introduced it in 1885. The entire surface is acid-etched, providing greater contrast for the rose and leaves highlighted by the engraver. The beautiful bowl is used on many of the Gorham Jac Rose servers – pointed with a small flange, with the suggestion of a shell in its interior. The spoon could be used for sugar, marmalade, or as a small berry spoon. The jac rose is again carved into the bowl...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1091936
Bargentum
$33.00
Durgin's 'Bead' is a full-line pattern introduced in 1893 – a very substantial pattern having a tipt end and outlined with fine beads. This is a fine example, with long tines giving the fork a sense of elegance. Condition is excellent, and there is no monogram. Marked with the Durgin logo, its length is 4-7/8 in., and it weighs 12 grams.
All Items : Silver : Pre 1970 item #1057032 (stock #B2588)
Bargentum
$32.00
Animals – hounds, squirrels, rabbits, and foliage – oak leaves, acorns, berries – decorate the plated handles of this youth knife and fork, with pond lilies and fish on the fork's reverse. The stainless knife blade is marked “Mirrorstele,” (a trademark name registered to Reed & Barton since 1926) and “Reed & Barton.” There are shallow scratches commensurate with age, but the pattern is crisp and there is no indication of wear through the plate.
All Items : : Pre 1900 item #1037188 (stock #X2364C)
Bargentum
$32.00
Clematis is a lovely pattern introduced by Gorham in 1885. It was first acid-etched – that is, the pattern is revealed by etching of the surface with an acid bath – and the details were then hand- engraved to provide the multi-textured surface that is characteristic of this pattern... there is the sense of a vine that follows the form of the spoon's upper handle, with the leaves and flowers springing from that vine...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1080171 (stock #1062)
Bargentum
$32.00
Whiting's “Alhambra,” which was introduced in 1880 during a decade full of patterns with exotic references to places and cultures that defined the Romantic period. The handle is a fluted column topped by a geometric form filled with threaded tendrils on a textured background and a central cartouche which contains a script monogram H. The bowl is an elongated shell form with alternating rounded and pointed edges...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1110698
Bargentum
$30.00
Condition of this 150-year old salt spoon is very good. The threaded handle is double struck and encloses a honeysuckle vine which forms a cartouche on both sides. There is a monogram in script, Kettell, in the cartouche on the top of the handle. Even the bowl is free of salt damage. The length is 3-11/16 in. and it weighs 10g. Westervelt's mark is on the back of the handle.
All Items : Silver : Pre 1910 item #1035322 (stock #2277)
Bargentum
$30.00
This fork is an example of a prolific maker of reproduction pieces that were marketed around 1900 – coinciding with the rise of the Arts & Crafts movement – as hand-made items based on antique forms...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1066369 (stock #X1770G)
Bargentum
$30.00
This lovely Whiting sterling pattern has only recently been identified as “La France,'' having previously been known as “Roses and Scroll” or whatever the viewer might choose. It doesn't seem to have been a full line pattern, but one that people are often drawn to. The handle shows a softening of the pattern and is punctuated by a shallow N monogram. The pointed bowl has light but even remnants of gold wash with a small and very shallow dent that is mentioned for clarity. This citrus ...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1940 item #1084223
Bargentum
$30.00
This set of 6 stainless fish knives and forks probably dates from the early to middle part of the 20th Century. The form is Old English Tipt, a timeless pattern. Harrison Fisher has been a knife maker in Sheffield (England) for over 150 years. The set is very good quality – nicely balanced and in very good condition – I would guess they were little used. The knife is 8 in. and the fork is 6.75 in. They are marked with HF & Co. (the mark used after 1900) , “S” in a shield, and “Eve...
All Items : Silver : Pre 1900 item #1109758 (stock #2724)
Bargentum
$25.00
This fork is not marked, but surely silver plate and probably English. The condition is excellent, with no plate missing, no bubbling or flaking, despite its (probably) 100 years. “Prince Albert,” named for Queen Victoria's consort, was introduced before 1850 and became a standard English pattern which proved popular in the United States during the coin period. The bread fork – a Victorian introduction – was meant to be passed with the bread plate. This one is 6.75 in.
 
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